exercise_yes Tag

Author: Sofia Fournier Postpartum or after birth is a stage of life that is often ignored, just simply swept under the rug. We don’t think about what is going to happen to us after giving birth, and we don't ask too many questions. During pregnancy we are mainly focused on the here and now, and the furthest we think into the future is of the day we’ll be giving birth. But ladies, postpartum exists, postpartum is hard but it’s beautiful too, though at times it can be much less idyllic than we imagined it to be. In this post I'm going to try to give you an overview of the after birth, including physical and emotional changes and my advice on both a professional level as well as a personal level in my experience as a mother.

If you’re a female runner, be aware of how running affects your pelvic floor, and learn how to take care of it and prevent problems like urine leakage or organ prolapse. According to Kathrine Switzer, the first female runner to participate in a marathon in the United States, “the simple act of putting one foot in front of the other can change your life.’’ If you are a female runner, you know that running is not only a test of mental toughness, but also physical toughness. In addition to the most common injuries, running is also a contributing factor to the weakening of a woman’s pelvic floor that may result in problems such as urinary incontinence or organ prolapse.

Doing pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor offers many benefits, on both physical and emotional levels, and requires a relatively small time commitment. The pelvic floor exercise routines you’ll find in the Bwom app (available on App Store or Play Store) contain kegel exercises and hypopressive exercises and can be done in just 10 minutes- a small investment of time for big gains in your health and quality of life.

In continuation of our Kegel and Hypopressive series, we are going to show you ways of implementing these exercises secretly in your daily life. ;) This week's post focuses on how to discreetly perform Kegels and Hypopressive exercises at the office while working.

So now What?

After reading the two previous posts I'm All About That Kegel, The Hypopressive Exercise: The Hypo What?, we now know the background, importance and benefits of Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. But how are we supposed to implement them? When you have a busy day, usually the last thing you want to do is go to the gym or to set up a spot in your living space to do Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. However, there are other ways to perform them in public areas that are quick and discreet. You can continue training your pelvic floor wherever you go if you so choose. ;) Below are two ways in which you can train your pelvic floor by performing discreet exercises at the office.

Part 1

Transportation. Everybody has to use it. Going to work, school, vacation, and the gym. We generally spend a lot of time sitting during the day. Most people are not particularly fond of sitting all the time. However, it is a necessary evil for most jobs and/or if we plan on going anywhere further than our feet would like to carry us.

The Hypopressive exercise, also known as Hypopressive Abdominal Gymnastics, is a relatively recent technique used to help in exercising the pelvic floor and toning the abdomen. The reason Hypopressives are called Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics is due to the fact that the workout can be considered a sport in itself. (And it’s quick too! No more working out at the gym for 2 or more hours at a time… if you don’t want to that is.)

Original Content By Olatz Zeberio, Pelvic Floor Physiotherapy Specialist Transposed by Shannon Trudeaux

The Pelvic Floor Area

Most of you would probably better recognize the term just as the pelvic floor; however, the pelvic floor area encompasses more structures within your body than just the pelvic floor muscles. Thus, it is important to be able to identify the different pelvic areas in your body.