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Making an article about New Year Resolutions is already a classic for all health magazines and blogs. So, we wanted to create a different list: specific purposes for women’s health. Because our bodies are different and so are our needs. Whether you already have done your resolutions list or not, taking a look at these habits and goals will give you ideas to improve your well-being and rock  2018.

Menstruation is a symbol of feminine nature and health. Therefore, your period and your menstrual cycle are indicators of your overall health! When you get your period, the only message you might read is that you’re not pregnant. However, it can give you much more information about your health: weight problems, stress, hormonal imbalances… Pay attention to your cycle, it may be trying to tell you something! Get the keys to understanding your menstrual flow in this blog post.

By Rachel Spurrier When I was discharged from the hospital after having my first child, I was given a “welcome home” packet with information about how to care for my newborn, breastfeeding advice, warning signs to look out for in the immediate days postpartum, and general advice about my new postpartum body.  In the fog of new motherhood and extreme sleep deprivation, I barely touched the pages of literature that were there to “aid” me. I spent the initial postpartum days hobbling around our NYC apartment trying to figure out how to swaddle my baby, change his diapers, and breastfeed, all while trying to wean myself off pain medication I was given to help me cope with my badly bruised tailbone, tearing, and my episiotomy.  

Ahhh Valentine's Day, a treasured time of feeling like it's socially acceptable to half-eat a dozen truffles and chocolates out of a bright read heart-shaped box (btw, am I the only one who hates the pink nougat mystery filling...anyone with me? anyone??). Speaking of divisive, we def know how polarizing V-Day can be in general. Some live for February 14th to roll around so they can enjoy that super economical pre-fixe lobster special with their beloved boo. Some despise how forced the whole day can feel and would rather hang out with their cat, eat stale popcorn, and binge-watch Scandal. We totally get it.

By Julie Sacks, Meditation Teacher & Well-being Entrepreneur It’s that time of year when we all think about setting our intentions for the year ahead. Wouldn’t it be great if we could commit to just one life changing habit that would naturally help all our other goals fall into place? Well, I believe that one habit is meditation. If meditation were a pill, we would all take it. It has no downside, only an upside. There are numerous benefits, such as better sleep, stress management, slowing down the aging process and increased energy and productivity – just to name a few. The countless benefits of meditation have been well documented by many credible sources, including Harvard Medical School, UCLA, NYT’s and CNN.

Stress affects everyone and, while small amounts of stress are a normal part of life, chronic stress is not. But being stressed all the time can do a lot of damage to your emotional wellbeing and, for women, your pelvic floor. Ok, so your pelvic floor might be the last thing you think about when you’ve got a million other things to take care of. We understand but, real talk, your pelvic floor should be something you’re concerned with. A strong, healthy pelvic floor can help you stay in shape, give you confidence, and keep your entire reproductive system operating at it’s best. So how does stress affect your pelvic floor? Read on!

Getting and staying healthy can feel complicated. When you have at least three thousand other things on your to-do list, making time for doctor’s appointments, remembering to pick up tampons (or even remembering when you’re supposed to start your period), and fitting in workouts can feel like monumental tasks. And while it can seem like all of these responsibilities fall on your shoulders, we don’t believe in the myth of “superwoman”. In other words, you can’t do it all by yourself, with the help of women's health apps.  That’s why we’ve rounded up our absolute favorite women's health apps of the moment. Each useful in their own right, these apps are making managing your health a whole lot easier.

Author: Sofia Fournier Postpartum or after birth is a stage of life that is often ignored, just simply swept under the rug. We don’t think about what is going to happen to us after giving birth, and we don't ask too many questions. During pregnancy we are mainly focused on the here and now, and the furthest we think into the future is of the day we’ll be giving birth. But ladies, postpartum exists, postpartum is hard but it’s beautiful too, though at times it can be much less idyllic than we imagined it to be. In this post I'm going to try to give you an overview of the after birth, including physical and emotional changes and my advice on both a professional level as well as a personal level in my experience as a mother.

Author: Erin Jackson, JD, MA There are two floral potholders on metal stirrups, adding to the lunacy of the situation.  Lying there in a paper gown that makes a crunching sound as it collapses into the paper rolled over the table, I reluctantly slide towards my doctor, who’s gesturing for me to come closer. I’m here for myself, for my intimate health. So I gingerly extend each foot to a stirrup, resting them on the potholders. Peering over my knees, I notice that I didn’t even match my socks this morning, and then my doctor’s head appears between the potholders.  She grabs her light, moves its glare between the potholders, and gently taps my knees. “Just relax your knees now.”

Abdominal pressure caused by sneezing, coughing, vomiting, jumping, or weight lifting, can cause urine leakage and pelvic organ prolapse (can be identified as a heavy feeling in the vagina) in women that have a weakened pelvic floor. In this blogpost we give you recommendations and techniques to avoid leakage when coughing and sneezing. This way you can protect your body and pelvic area.