Real Stories

By Rachel Spurrier When I was discharged from the hospital after having my first child, I was given a “welcome home” packet with information about how to care for my newborn, breastfeeding advice, warning signs to look out for in the immediate days postpartum, and general advice about my new postpartum body.  In the fog of new motherhood and extreme sleep deprivation, I barely touched the pages of literature that were there to “aid” me. I spent the initial postpartum days hobbling around our NYC apartment trying to figure out how to swaddle my baby, change his diapers, and breastfeed, all while trying to wean myself off pain medication I was given to help me cope with my badly bruised tailbone, tearing, and my episiotomy.  

Image: Getty

Zosia Mamet, one of the stars of HBO’s Girls, got real at the AOL’s Makers Conference in LA in February. Her revelation? Her six-year struggle with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), a common pelvic condition.

“For six years it felt like I had the worst UTI of my life,” Mamet told the crowd. Despite suffering from symptoms including intense pain during sex and urinary incontinence for six years, doctors wouldn’t take her seriously.