Kegels

In yoga, the pelvic floor is known as the root chakra. In sex research, the pelvic floor is known as the root of female orgasm! Many of us learn to tone the pelvic floor with the Kegel exercise, named after Dr. Arnold Kegel who also studied how the pelvic floor contributes to our sexual health. The pelvic floor is made up of the muscles and tissues that line the pelvis. During penetration, the pelvic floor is stretched and widened. During orgasm, the pelvic floor contracts. And a toned pelvic floor that can contract and release its muscles more deeply, helps us to experience orgasm more deeply.

If you’re like most women, you’ve probably at least heard of Kegels. But did you know that they are for more than preventing bladder leaks? It’s true! In the mid-1940’s, Dr. Arnold Kegel developed an exercise to help women who were experiencing urinary continence. Many women who tried this exercise found that, in addition to having better control over their bladders, they were also experiencing better sex.

Your body undergoes many changes during the pregnancy and postpartum period. These changes are common, like having painful sex after delivery, but should not be considered your new normal. Many of these changes can be successfully treated conservatively—without surgery or medication, through pelvic floor physical therapy visits and a home program. In this True or False Article, we demystify sex after the baby.

Doing pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor offers many benefits, on both physical and emotional levels, and requires a relatively small time commitment. The pelvic floor exercise routines you’ll find in the Bwom app (available on App Store or Play Store) contain kegel exercises and hypopressive exercises and can be done in just 10 minutes- a small investment of time for big gains in your health and quality of life.

Does the use of Ben Wa Balls have the same benefits as Kegel exercises? Are Ben Wa Balls indicated for Urinary Incontinence Problems?

Over the past few years there has been a lot of hype over the use of Ben Wa Balls, Kegels, and Smart Kegel Devices. It's wonderful that more and more women are learning to exercise their pelvic floor. However, when you want to find reliable sources on what exercises are best to practice (either as a preventative measure or as a solution to problems like urinary incontinence), they are often scattered and unreliable. Word of mouth often creates myths like that "I can train my pelvic floor just with Chinese balls", while online, professional information is often confused with advertisements of products that promise more than 50 shades of Grey. In addition, it use to be generalized information that doesn't consider that every woman and every state of life is different.

Part 1

Transportation. Everybody has to use it. Going to work, school, vacation, and the gym. We generally spend a lot of time sitting during the day. Most people are not particularly fond of sitting all the time. However, it is a necessary evil for most jobs and/or if we plan on going anywhere further than our feet would like to carry us.

In continuation of our Kegel and Hypopressive series, we are going to show you ways of implementing these exercises secretly in your daily life. ;) This week's post focuses on how to discreetly perform Kegels and Hypopressive exercises at the office while working.

So now What?

After reading the two previous posts I'm All About That Kegel, The Hypopressive Exercise: The Hypo What?, we now know the background, importance and benefits of Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. But how are we supposed to implement them? When you have a busy day, usually the last thing you want to do is go to the gym or to set up a spot in your living space to do Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. However, there are other ways to perform them in public areas that are quick and discreet. You can continue training your pelvic floor wherever you go if you so choose. ;) Below are two ways in which you can train your pelvic floor by performing discreet exercises at the office.

Original Content by Olatz Zeberio, Transposed by Shannon Trudeaux The muscles of the pelvic floor undergo changes throughout the course of a woman's life such as pregnancy and menopause. And in some cases the pelvic floor is weakened through these experienced changes. In others it simply requires more attention. However there are 5 main factors that damage the pelvic floor.  The pelvic floor is damaged when it receives excessive pressure, stress or injuries in any of the structures of the pelvic area. Taking care of the pelvic area is important for preventing problems like Urinary Incontinence (urine leakage) and improving your intimate health. For this reason it is important to know the five main factors that can harm your pelvic floor: