If you’re a female runner, be aware of how running affects your pelvic floor, and learn how to take care of it and prevent problems like urine leakage or organ prolapse. According to Kathrine Switzer, the first female runner to participate in a marathon in the United States, “the simple act of putting one foot in front of the other can change your life.’’ If you are a female runner, you know that running is not only a test of mental toughness, but also physical toughness. In addition to the most common injuries, running is also a contributing factor to the weakening of a woman’s pelvic floor that may result in problems such as urinary incontinence or organ prolapse.

Doing pelvic floor exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor offers many benefits, on both physical and emotional levels, and requires a relatively small time commitment. The pelvic floor exercise routines you’ll find in the Bwom app (available on App Store or Play Store) contain kegel exercises and hypopressive exercises and can be done in just 10 minutes- a small investment of time for big gains in your health and quality of life.

Does the use of Ben Wa Balls have the same benefits as Kegel exercises? Are Ben Wa Balls indicated for Urinary Incontinence Problems?

Over the past few years there has been a lot of hype over the use of Ben Wa Balls, Kegels, and Smart Kegel Devices. It's wonderful that more and more women are learning to exercise their pelvic floor. However, when you want to find reliable sources on what exercises are best to practice (either as a preventative measure or as a solution to problems like urinary incontinence), they are often scattered and unreliable. Word of mouth often creates myths like that "I can train my pelvic floor just with Chinese balls", while online, professional information is often confused with advertisements of products that promise more than 50 shades of Grey. In addition, it use to be generalized information that doesn't consider that every woman and every state of life is different.

Abdominal pressure caused by sneezing, coughing, vomiting, jumping, or weight lifting, can cause urine leakage and pelvic organ prolapse (can be identified as a heavy feeling in the vagina) in women that have a weakened pelvic floor. In this blogpost we give you recommendations and techniques to avoid leakage when coughing and sneezing. This way you can protect your body and pelvic area.

Did you know that chronic respiratory diseases pose a risk of weakening of the pelvic muscles? Women who suffer from these have a higher risk of pelvic floor problems such as urinary incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, or sexual dysfunction. In this post you will understand why this occurs and how to avoid future problems with your pelvic floor.

In continuation of our Kegel and Hypopressive series, we are going to show you ways of implementing these exercises secretly in your daily life. ;) This week's post focuses on how to discreetly perform Kegels and Hypopressive exercises at the office while working.

So now What?

After reading the two previous posts I'm All About That Kegel, The Hypopressive Exercise: The Hypo What?, we now know the background, importance and benefits of Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. But how are we supposed to implement them? When you have a busy day, usually the last thing you want to do is go to the gym or to set up a spot in your living space to do Kegel and Hypopressive exercises. However, there are other ways to perform them in public areas that are quick and discreet. You can continue training your pelvic floor wherever you go if you so choose. ;) Below are two ways in which you can train your pelvic floor by performing discreet exercises at the office.

Part 1

Transportation. Everybody has to use it. Going to work, school, vacation, and the gym. We generally spend a lot of time sitting during the day. Most people are not particularly fond of sitting all the time. However, it is a necessary evil for most jobs and/or if we plan on going anywhere further than our feet would like to carry us.

The Hypopressive exercise, also known as Hypopressive Abdominal Gymnastics, is a relatively recent technique used to help in exercising the pelvic floor and toning the abdomen. The reason Hypopressives are called Abdominal Hypopressive Gymnastics is due to the fact that the workout can be considered a sport in itself. (And it’s quick too! No more working out at the gym for 2 or more hours at a time… if you don’t want to that is.)