With our busy and often stressful lives it is important to our health and our happiness that we try our best to practice mindfulness. Mindfulness is our ability to be fully present and aware of what is happening around us without becoming overwhelmed and anxious (1). This is something that we all do naturally, but sometimes life gets too hectic and we become less aware of our surroundings or we let our surroundings overwhelm us. Studies show that when you practice mindfulness and you train your brain to focus directly on what you’re experiencing and feeling, you are actually physically restructuring your brain! (1)

We may not think of it, but water can have a large impact on our overall and day-to-day health. As I’m sure you may know, it is important to hydrate regularly in order to preserve adequate mental and physical functions. Many of us do not pay attention to how much water we are drinking and how this can be affecting how we feel and what is happening inside of our bodies. In fact, very few epidemiological studies have even been done on fluid and water intake (1).

By Rachel Spurrier When I was discharged from the hospital after having my first child, I was given a “welcome home” packet with information about how to care for my newborn, breastfeeding advice, warning signs to look out for in the immediate days postpartum, and general advice about my new postpartum body.  In the fog of new motherhood and extreme sleep deprivation, I barely touched the pages of literature that were there to “aid” me. I spent the initial postpartum days hobbling around our NYC apartment trying to figure out how to swaddle my baby, change his diapers, and breastfeed, all while trying to wean myself off pain medication I was given to help me cope with my badly bruised tailbone, tearing, and my episiotomy.  

Post by Parsley Health  Research and anecdotal evidence has shown that stress is the greatest threat to pregnancy, but also the prenatal period, the postpartum period, menarche and menopause.  It’s much more prevalent than the Zika virus or fetal alcohol syndrome. More importantly, stress is ubiquitous. No one is entirely free of it. And, like any toxin, it’s potency is directly related to the dose.  

Ah, the vagina! One of the most celebrated parts of a woman’s body and for good reason. Vaginas are fierce and have made a comeback in pop culture as the unofficial mascot for some modern Internet feminist movements and even politicians! From Vagina Monologues to vagina Halloween costumes, it seems that every day more and more people are becoming open to seeing and talking about vaginas. But few women, and even fewer men, are open enough to talk about some of the problems that women may face with their vaginas, such as vaginal prolapse.

By Agata Krupa, specialist in urogynecology and obstetrics. Pregnancy and childbirth are two important stages in our life as women, mainly because it means creating or expanding our family, but also it plays a key role in our health, because our body changes significantly. All these...

Your body undergoes many changes during the pregnancy and postpartum period. These changes are common, like having painful sex after delivery, but should not be considered your new normal. Many of these changes can be successfully treated conservatively—without surgery or medication, through pelvic floor physical therapy visits and a home program. In this True or False Article, we demystify sex after the baby.

Image: Getty

Zosia Mamet, one of the stars of HBO’s Girls, got real at the AOL’s Makers Conference in LA in February. Her revelation? Her six-year struggle with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), a common pelvic condition.

“For six years it felt like I had the worst UTI of my life,” Mamet told the crowd. Despite suffering from symptoms including intense pain during sex and urinary incontinence for six years, doctors wouldn’t take her seriously.

Many women believe that urinary incontinence is a problem for older women. Friend, this is a true myth, a misconception that causes many women that experience urine leaks when coughing, sneezing or running feel embarrassed and prevents them from talking about it. And there you have it! That’s how a very common health problem, which we can all prevent and improve, becomes a taboo that causes insecurities in many women. Yes, even though urine leakage isn't a common topic of conversation over dinner with friends, it is something that many many women have. One study reports that half of women in the USA develop some kind of urinary incontinence in their lifetime.

International Women's Day is a commemorative day adopted by the UN in 1975, in the midst of the industrial revolution, to claim the struggle of women to participate in society in equality with men. Nowadays is a day to celebrate the social, economic, political and cultural role of women in society, but also to claim and denounce pending issues, such as gender equality, women's health rights or gender violence.