October is the month for Breast Cancer awareness. It’s the perfect opportunity for us women to learn more about our bodies, to take prevention seriously and to build healthy habits, such as performing regular breast check ups. This October, Bwom has partnered up with the Keep A Breast Foundation to raise awareness about the importance of prevention. For every exercise plan that you buy at Bwom, we will donate 50% of the proceed to Keep a Breast to help them with the common goal of raising awareness about the importance of breast cancer prevention and healthy habits. Find out these 3 ways to practice prevention and lower your risk of breast cancer:

Getting and staying healthy can feel complicated. When you have at least three thousand other things on your to-do list, making time for doctor’s appointments, remembering to pick up tampons (or even remembering when you’re supposed to start your period), and fitting in workouts can feel like monumental tasks. And while it can seem like all of these responsibilities fall on your shoulders, we don’t believe in the myth of “superwoman”. In other words, you can’t do it all by yourself, with the help of women's health apps.  That’s why we’ve rounded up our absolute favorite women's health apps of the moment. Each useful in their own right, these apps are making managing your health a whole lot easier.

If you’re like most women, you’ve probably at least heard of Kegels. But did you know that they are for more than preventing bladder leaks? It’s true! In the mid-1940’s, Dr. Arnold Kegel developed an exercise to help women who were experiencing urinary continence. Many women who tried this exercise found that, in addition to having better control over their bladders, they were also experiencing better sex.

Author: Sofia Fournier Postpartum or after birth is a stage of life that is often ignored, just simply swept under the rug. We don’t think about what is going to happen to us after giving birth, and we don't ask too many questions. During pregnancy we are mainly focused on the here and now, and the furthest we think into the future is of the day we’ll be giving birth. But ladies, postpartum exists, postpartum is hard but it’s beautiful too, though at times it can be much less idyllic than we imagined it to be. In this post I'm going to try to give you an overview of the after birth, including physical and emotional changes and my advice on both a professional level as well as a personal level in my experience as a mother.

There is a lot of talk about ‘mummy tummy’ lately.  What to do about diastasis recti, why it happens, and why healing it matters.  For many it doesn’t matter to them why it happens, or even why it needs to be healed – they just want it gone!  Well girls – it is important to know why it happens and why healing it matters and knowing this information will actually help you get rid of it too!

Constipation is a common problem and affects many women who end up accepting it as a part of life. What you maybe don’t know is that, over time, constipation can damage your pelvic floor. Find out why and how to fight the problem: advice, habits and exercises for relieving stasis of the lower bowel from its root.

Your body undergoes many changes during the pregnancy and postpartum period. These changes are common, like having painful sex after delivery, but should not be considered your new normal. Many of these changes can be successfully treated conservatively—without surgery or medication, through pelvic floor physical therapy visits and a home program. In this True or False Article, we demystify sex after the baby.

Author: Erin Jackson, JD, MA There are two floral potholders on metal stirrups, adding to the lunacy of the situation.  Lying there in a paper gown that makes a crunching sound as it collapses into the paper rolled over the table, I reluctantly slide towards my doctor, who’s gesturing for me to come closer. I’m here for myself, for my intimate health. So I gingerly extend each foot to a stirrup, resting them on the potholders. Peering over my knees, I notice that I didn’t even match my socks this morning, and then my doctor’s head appears between the potholders.  She grabs her light, moves its glare between the potholders, and gently taps my knees. “Just relax your knees now.”

If you’re a female runner, be aware of how running affects your pelvic floor, and learn how to take care of it and prevent problems like urine leakage or organ prolapse. According to Kathrine Switzer, the first female runner to participate in a marathon in the United States, “the simple act of putting one foot in front of the other can change your life.’’ If you are a female runner, you know that running is not only a test of mental toughness, but also physical toughness. In addition to the most common injuries, running is also a contributing factor to the weakening of a woman’s pelvic floor that may result in problems such as urinary incontinence or organ prolapse.

We appreciate your feedback- it’s making Bwom even better! In our most recent update, you’ll find several new features to help you take charge of your intimate health. There will be no room for excuses not to work out!  Keep reading to find out more!