Ah, the vagina! One of the most celebrated parts of a woman’s body and for good reason. Vaginas are fierce and have made a comeback in pop culture as the unofficial mascot for some modern Internet feminist movements and even politicians! From Vagina Monologues to vagina Halloween costumes, it seems that every day more and more people are becoming open to seeing and talking about vaginas. But few women, and even fewer men, are open enough to talk about some of the problems that women may face with their vaginas, such as vaginal prolapse.

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Zosia Mamet, one of the stars of HBO’s Girls, got real at the AOL’s Makers Conference in LA in February. Her revelation? Her six-year struggle with pelvic floor dysfunction (PFD), a common pelvic condition.

“For six years it felt like I had the worst UTI of my life,” Mamet told the crowd. Despite suffering from symptoms including intense pain during sex and urinary incontinence for six years, doctors wouldn’t take her seriously.

Many women believe that urinary incontinence is a problem for older women. Friend, this is a true myth, a misconception that causes many women that experience urine leaks when coughing, sneezing or running feel embarrassed and prevents them from talking about it. And there you have it! That’s how a very common health problem, which we can all prevent and improve, becomes a taboo that causes insecurities in many women. Yes, even though urine leakage isn't a common topic of conversation over dinner with friends, it is something that many many women have. One study reports that half of women in the USA develop some kind of urinary incontinence in their lifetime.

International Women's Day is a commemorative day adopted by the UN in 1975, in the midst of the industrial revolution, to claim the struggle of women to participate in society in equality with men. Nowadays is a day to celebrate the social, economic, political and cultural role of women in society, but also to claim and denounce pending issues, such as gender equality, women's health rights or gender violence.

Ahhh Valentine's Day, a treasured time of feeling like it's socially acceptable to half-eat a dozen truffles and chocolates out of a bright read heart-shaped box (btw, am I the only one who hates the pink nougat mystery filling...anyone with me? anyone??). Speaking of divisive, we def know how polarizing V-Day can be in general. Some live for February 14th to roll around so they can enjoy that super economical pre-fixe lobster special with their beloved boo. Some despise how forced the whole day can feel and would rather hang out with their cat, eat stale popcorn, and binge-watch Scandal. We totally get it.

By Julie Sacks, Meditation Teacher & Well-being Entrepreneur It’s that time of year when we all think about setting our intentions for the year ahead. Wouldn’t it be great if we could commit to just one life changing habit that would naturally help all our other goals fall into place? Well, I believe that one habit is meditation. If meditation were a pill, we would all take it. It has no downside, only an upside. There are numerous benefits, such as better sleep, stress management, slowing down the aging process and increased energy and productivity – just to name a few. The countless benefits of meditation have been well documented by many credible sources, including Harvard Medical School, UCLA, NYT’s and CNN.

The beginning of the year is without a doubt one of the best times to think about new resolutions and goals. Within the Top 10 Resolutions we find... quit smoking, go to the gym, eat better and of course, lose weight. Good, all this is important. However, we suggest thought that goes beyond a specific health objective. Resolution for 2017: Make yourself a priority How much time do you devote to work on a daily basis? And to your family, your partner, your friends? And how much time do you devote to yourself?

Self-care is a crucial part of life. It can make the difference between feeling cool, calm, and collected or wanting to pull your hair out every time something else gets added to your to-do list. During the holidays, this is truer than ever. Though the holiday season can bring a lot of joy, many Americans feel that they are more stressed at this time of year. Instead of accepting being stressed as part of life create some small (but significant!) self-care habits. Remember, stress can even affect your pelvic floor! We’re not just talking about getting your nails done or spending 20 minutes meditating every morning (though these are greats ways to practice self-care). The kind of self-care we like to practice during the holidays is more about allowing your whole life to be centered around your own well-being. Why? Because you can’t take care of others if you don’t feel your best. Here are 6 self-care tips that will make this the best holiday season ever.

Stress affects everyone and, while small amounts of stress are a normal part of life, chronic stress is not. But being stressed all the time can do a lot of damage to your emotional wellbeing and, for women, your pelvic floor. Ok, so your pelvic floor might be the last thing you think about when you’ve got a million other things to take care of. We understand but, real talk, your pelvic floor should be something you’re concerned with. A strong, healthy pelvic floor can help you stay in shape, give you confidence, and keep your entire reproductive system operating at it’s best. So how does stress affect your pelvic floor? Read on!

By Susie Gronski Who says sex has to stop after you hit menopause? Well, according to an international survey of 4,100 women, up to 50% said that sex was painful (1) Ouch! 50%?! That’s a whole lotta deprived vaginas. Top 5 symptoms you might complain of in your golden years:
  • A vagina dryer than the Sahara desert
  • Getting “hot” and not it a good way
  • Waking up to a pool of sweat in your bed sheets
  • Insomnia
  • That annoying belly fat that won't go away no matter what diet or exercise fad you try